About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 7
KQED (PBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
CNNW 3
CNN 2
KQEH (PBS) 2
LINKTV 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WETA 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
distinguished career in congress advocating on behalf of those voices who were often drowned out in washington by the influence of the moneyed interest. over the last 40 years, congressman stark has been one of the foremost advocates on behalf on efforts to ensure that americans were able to access quality, affordable health insurance. i am honored to have been one of the three principaled co- authors in the house of the historic affordable care act which will provide quality insurance for every single american. the key role mr. stark in drafting that law and made sure that the law provided needed relief for working families. this was a crucial accomplishment, yet it was far from mr. stark's only accomplishment in the field of health care. as a former chair and ranking democrat on the ways and means health subcommittee for many years, he was a leader on the health care reform. he was a lead author of the original cobra insurance bill which ensured that workers faced with losing their jobs would not also immediately lose access to the needed health insurance. and those of us who have gone throu
understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a backgrou
in washington. it ended with the reelection of barack obama. if you could think of adjectives, what would they be to describe these seven years? >> interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. full of opportunities for the country. there were good times during these 12 years, laced together with some that were not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were
, they are supposed to have it sorted by january 1. we report from washington. >> sundown on capitol hill in washington d.c. -- washington, d.c., and senate majority leader comes to the microphones to send everyone home until early monday morning, no deal imminent. the mother is still significant difference, but negotiations->> -- >> there is still significant difference, but negotiations continue. >> republicans sought late-day changes to social security in return for tax hikes on the rich. >> the consequences for this are too high for the american people to be engaged in a political messaging campaign. >> the social security move was met with this belief by democrats. so much so, they have no answer to it. >> at this stage, i do not have a counter offer. >> an attempt to broker a deal came up from as high as the vice president. of twoconfident that one things are going to happen when it comes to the fiscal clip. number one, we will see an agreement in the next 48 hours, in which case, middle-class taxes will not go up. if that does not happen, then democrats in the senate will put a bil
falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a ne
. it is a process -- people think of a filibuster in "mr. smith goes to washington." i think we should have those rules in place to change it so mr. smith stays on the floor during the filibuster. it does not just run time against the senate. it does not make any sense. if somebody feels strongly enough that they want to bring the senate to a halt, they should be willing to stay there on the floor and explain why, and i think it would be self- enforcing if people would be less likely to. people look at the senate and cannot work together, cannot get anything done, and one person wants their pay to be docked. >> any other reforms or tuneups? >> if somebody put a hold on it, you could not find out who did it. secret holds on nominees. once you put a hold on them, that was it. that was wrong. we have cleaned up the rules in many different ways. you would have a 60-vote threshold to do some like that. the people back home cannot understand that. they should not accept it. >> what about the lowest point? >> as part of the affordable care at, i tried to get medicaid for the expansion of medicaid, to ta
with him, we will see a new political atmosphere in washington. at this point it seems like more of the same. host: from facebook -- guest: one thing i a lot about yesterday was this is really raising the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the ame
boehner can strike a deal. we'll have the latest on the battle of wills in washington. >> the president is out this morning with a not-so-conciliatory note. we'll get the latest from david kerley coming up. >>> check this out. why all new cars may soon be spying on their drivers and making it tough for you to cover your tracks. >>> we're going to start, though, with what should have been a joyous week for the royal family. but news of kate's pregnancy was very quickly overshadowed by her hospitalization for morning sickness, a prank call that duped two of her nurses, and then, the suspected suicide of one of those nurses. this morning, the boss of the two australian deejays behind this prank is now speaking out. and abc's jeffrey kofman is in london on the story. jeffrey, good morning to you, sir. >> reporter: and good morning to you, dan. an outpouring of indignation, that is what we are seeing around the world as news of this story spreads. and nowhere is it stronger than in australia. all of it focused on the two radio presenters behind the hoax call. >> this is 9 news. >> a sydney r
's washington office. she's always been on the cutting edge of things that really matter. let me start off by saying i do not think there is an anti- innovation caucus. i do not think there is anybody who is opposed to innovation. it is a little bit like apple pie or rg3. let me ask you all to describe what we really mean by innovation. what are the two or three priorities we ought to really be talking about? glenn? >> let's start on that side. >> i thought you'd start on that side. >> i go to my right first. >> there are three types of innovation. one is scientific innovation that allows the second innovation which is the technology innovation, to take the underlying discovery and commercialize its, turning it into a product that can be used for consumer customers. what is equally important is how you can then take a discovery, it turned into a technology, and you can deliver it in a way that allows you to build a business that gets you a margin that can support the business. basic science innovation, technology innovations, and business model innovations are the ones we think of. google
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
william burns is scheduled to meet tuesday in washington. >>> a search for active earthquake faults near japan's nuclear power plant may lead to the scrapping of one of them. implications run deep. >> reporter: 17 commercial nuclear plants and one major test reactor have been built in japan. the nuclear regulation authority was formed after last year's disaster to monitor their safety. experts at the authority are trying to determine if any of the reactors lie above active fault lines. the tsuruga plant in central japan has been known to have an active fault running close by. the fault is called urasoko. another fault intersects with it. it runs right under the facility's number two reactor. a team of experts dug up the ground at the plant so they could inspect the fault directly. the government panel examined the results of the so-called trade survey. panel members said on monday that the d-1 fault is probably active. they said that layers of earth near the fault have become deformed. the deformation is believed to cause d-1 to become active when national guidelines ban the building of
. these are live pictures from the national defense university right here in washington, d.c. we'll go there live. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. [ female announcer ] holiday cookies are a big job. everything has to be just right. perfection is in the details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was
bureaucracy in washington that this report has clearly revealed. why for a civil have made toward the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel an
press club here in washington today. he will talk about election shun reform. c-span will have it live beginning at 1:00 eastern. at 7:00 eastern c-span will be live with a discussion on skilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is talking about a bill that will allow more highly killed immigrants into the united states. it will be hosted by the university of virginia. >>> we've had explosions of knowledge in medicine but we've not coordinated care. all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating and you got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people over all, i mean on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? and of course now we've got the institute of medicine report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care, when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures? this is something i think which is for the first time, really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
, amid fears they might wind up in the hands of islamic extremist groups. just this week, washington branded one such group-- the al- nusra front-- an offshoot of al qaida in iraq. but the head of the opposition council said today the islamist fighters are partly responsible for the latest rebel gains. >> ( translated ): the decision to consider one of the fronts facing off to the regime as a terrorist group needs reconsideration. we insanely love our country and while we may disagree with some on their thought process and politics, we affirm that all weapons used by the revolutionaries aim for the fall of this tyrannical, criminal regime. >> ifill: there was no dissent over the marrakech meeting's decision to send increased humanitarian aid and other non- military support. the u.n. now estimates that half a million syrians have fled to neighboring countries with two million more displaced within syria itself. >> ifill: for more on the syrian political opposition i'm joined now by murhaf joujati, professor of middle east studies at the national defense university and a former member
to iraq to force saddam hussein from power. al jazeera, washington. >> a memorial service is about to be held for civilians killed a year ago in an air strike on the turkish border with iraq. 17 children were among the group of 34 killed by f-16 jets after being spotted crossing the border in unmanned drone footage. 12 months on, him rights watch says there was no accountability of the incident. our reporter on the turkey-iraq border explains why relatives are still waiting for a proper investigation. >> there is some secrecy on the investigations because there is an army investigation and they keep it secret so far. the turkish prime minister made comments to about the incident, but he is not sure to do a clear statement that relieves the people here in this village of the families, and they are all waiting for the final result that comes after the investigations. and they want the authorities to fasten the process and, with a clear result. >> heavy rain continues to fall and parts of sri lanka hit by recent floods. at least 32 people have been killed by high water and landslides.
] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn hostile in the united states and its allies. new developments, he has led the way on many issues of great concern to ftd. he is founder and co-chair of the bipartisan senate caucus on weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, in that capacity worked across the partisan divide to highlight serious threats of -- weapons of mass deliberation. he has done as much to run our greatest threat in the middle east and often lead the way on pressure advancing nuclear activities and efforts to destabilize the middle east. in
in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel. i spent the entire night last night time to think of a way to do this and entertaining and humorous way. there is no such a way. this is about weapons of mass destruction in the middle east. it is a serious topic, and we have very serious experts. people who are the leading rights in non-proliferation. joe had the privilege of spending a year working with in a project on the lease nonproliferation, and we're going to have a very detailed report that we will be issuing in january. well over 100 pages already. very specific recommendations on how to deal with this grave threat. we have talked about the iranian nuclear program, the pursuit of nuclear weapons, the implications to the ad states, israel, our allies, the possi
not being able to provide the service that they do today would be devastating. >> reporter: if washington can't reach a compromise, the economic recovery could stall. if we cannot figure this out, they're putting a bunch of huge and ugly potholes on a road that was supposedly going to get us to economic recovery. >> reporter: in fact, air traffic controllers warn that more than 100 small airports could lose their control towers. jobs and revenue that may never come back. john bentley, cbs news, new york. >> winter storms are spreading across the country, a massive storm that created havoc east of the mississippi is now headed to new england. that storm left a trail of power outages in the southeast after dumping some 15 inches of snow. in california, heavy snows continue to pile up. but inside the storm clouds there is a silver lining, as carter evans reports. >> reporter: snow fell again today in california's mountains. the latest in a string of storms that could have a major effect on the state's drought. >> if this trend top storys we'll be looking at excess water, rather than a water
on a nuclear device and set it off in new york or washington or some other city. (instrumental music) >> the president wants $489 billion in defense cuts over ten years. pentagon officials say the goal is to create a smaller, flexible force that can fight traditional wars and mount special operations. >> now that we know the threats that are out there, where is our money being spent? >> the congressional budget office had an estimate that they put the total u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. now, that is 20 percent of all federal spending, that is more than half of all discretionary spending. it's a substantial commitment to the united states. >> we spend less and less of our defense dollars on things that actually defend us. fifty percent of our defense budget goes to personnel. much of that personnel is bureaucratic personnel manning various defense department sites. >> currently much of the money is going to conventional needs, personnel, r and d and nuclear weapons. >> the congress debated the issue of replenishment of our stock or at least making certain it was okay and
affairs committee chairman ed royce. please join me in welcoming him to f.d.d.'s washington forum. >> let me thank mark here and thank the foundation for the defense of democracies. what i want to express is my appreciation as a member of the house for the work that you do, for the work product that you provide us, i can say i only wish we had deployed that more decisively sooner, but in terms of what you do, in terms of the analysis that you provide, in terms of the communication, the ability to communicate that to members of the senate and the house, i have to say it's the whole package and it is very important work. and i think if i could share one thought in particular is your work on sanctions emenergy sanctions that i think is critical. and i want to say congratulations. i saw director woolsey when i came in and i appreciate the briefings we have received from him and the ability to get the type of analysis also from cliff and mark and the whole f.d.d. team. it's so helpful. if you were to ask me, what is going to be the focal point, what's the main concern we have, i think it has b
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)